Good Music Can Literally Make You High, And There's Even An App That Imitates Drug Effects

By Charisse Mae Villanueva | Apr 14, 2017 01:56 PM EDT
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Ear Defenders
(Photo : Photo by Peter King/Fox Photos/Getty Images) 1st August 1972: Christine Harris wearing Auralgard II Ear Defenders during an exhibition at the Design Centre in London.

Music is one of the most beautiful aspects of life, a mood maker, and memory stimulant. And yes, listening gets a person literally high especially when a favorite song is playing. There is also an app that could imitate effects from illegal drugs.

It is not really magic, but not a rocket science neither. It is more of a neuroscience and it has to do with the brain's two-phase reward process, Maxim has learned. The first part is when the brain is flooded by dopamine, the controller of pleasure. The second part is when those dopamines act like heroin and morphine through the opioid receptor, which is responsible for giving a person "high" when under the influence of narcotics.

A study was conducted by McGill University to test if the opioid receptors are responsible in how pleasurable the brain finds music. The study picked 15 students and gave some of the participants a dose of naltrexone, an opioid blocker while giving the other fake naltrexone. Participants are then made to listen to two of their favorite songs and two neutral songs chosen by researchers.

It is found out that participants who took the real naltrexone find their favorite song less pleasurable. And what does it mean? Music can get a person high.

There are other ways to get a person high through digital sound. The "high" part is a simulation caused by "binaural beats" which was then achieved by listening to binaural waves. This technique is called "I-dosing" or listening through an app called "I-doser" and its doser files, as reported by Mail Online. The doser files are more like a noise than music, and it "rewires" the brain to feel a sensation, different to the phenomenon when people hear their favorite songs. This technique might not work and the effectivity varies from person to person.

© 2017 Mstars News, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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